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Patty Andrews

Performer
( b. Feb 16, 1918 Mound, Minnesota, USA - d. Jan 30, 2013 Northridge, California, USA ) Female
Relations: Sister of LaVerne Andrews
Sister of Maxene Andrews
Patty Andrews was the youngest of The Andrews Sisters whose popular music boosted morale during World War II. With their jazzy renditions of songs like "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy (of Company B)," "Rum and Coca-Cola" and "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)," Patty, Maxene and LaVerne Andrews sold war bonds, boosted morale on the home front, performed with Bing Crosby and with the Glenn Miller Orchestra, made movies and entertained thousands of American troops overseas, for whom the women represented the loves and the land the troops had left behind.

Patty, the youngest, was a soprano and sang lead; Maxene handled the high harmony; and LaVerne, the oldest, took the low notes. They began singing together as children; by the time they were teenagers they made up an accomplished vocal group. Modeling their act on the commercially successful Boswell Sisters, they joined a traveling revue and sang at county fairs and in vaudeville shows. Their big break came in 1937 when they were signed by Decca Records, but their first recording went nowhere. Their second effort featured the popular standard "Nice Work If You Can Get It," but it was the flip side that turned out to be pure gold. The song was a Yiddish show tune, "Bei Mir Bist Du Schön (Means That You're Grand)," with new English lyrics by Sammy Cahn, and the Andrews Sisters' version, recorded in 1937, became the top-selling record in the country.

Other hits followed, and in 1940 they were signed by Universal Pictures. They appeared in more than a dozen films during the next seven years -- sometimes just singing, sometimes also acting. They made their film debut in "Argentine Nights," a 1940 comedy that starred the Ritz Brothers, and the next year appeared in three films with Bud Abbott and Lou Costello: "Buck Privates," "In the Navy" and "Hold That Ghost." Their film credits also include "Swingtime Johnny" (1943), "Hollywood Canteen" (1944) and the Bob Hope-Bing Crosby comedy "Road to Rio" (1947).

Like her older sisters, Patty learned to love music as a child (she also became a good tap dancer), and she did not have to be persuaded when Maxene suggested that the sisters form a trio in 1932. She was 14 when they began to perform in public. Patty Andrews had appeared in a West Coast musical called Victory Canteen, set during World War II. When the show was rewritten for Broadway and renamed Over Here!, the producers decided that the Andrews Sisters were the only logical choice for the leads. They hired Patty and lured Maxene back into show business as well. The show opened in March 1974 and was the sisters' belated Broadway debut. It was also the last time they sang together.

Source: New York Times



Productions Date of Productions
Over Here!
[Musical, Original]
  • Starring: Patty Andrews [Paulette de Paul]
Mar 06, 1974 - Jan 04, 1975
Find out where Patty Andrews and are credited together