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Cy Feuer

Director, Producer, Theatre Owner/Operator, Writer
( b. Jan 15, 1911 Brooklyn, New York, USA - d. May 17, 2006 New York, New York, USA ) Male
Also known as: Seymour Arnold Feuer [Birthname]
Relations: Husband of Posy Feuer (1919 - 2005) her death
A legendary Broadway producer, director, composer, and musician, Cy Feuer brought to life many of America's most enduring musicals - both to the stage and screen.

Cy Feuer was born Seymour Arnold Feuer in Brooklyn to Herman Feuer, the manager of a Yiddish theater on Second Avenue on the Lower East Side, and the former Ann Abrams, a saleswoman in a dress shop.

Herman Feuer died of cancer when Cy was 13, leaving his mother, himself and his younger brother, Stan, to subsist on Mrs. Feuer's 1920's wages of $25 a week or less. Ann Feuer decided that Cy should learn to play the trumpet, and when he went to New Utrecht High School in South Brooklyn, where he was not an especially good student, he played trumpet in the band. She encouraged him to attend Juilliard.

He played the trumpet at the Roxy, at Radio City and other theatres, then became a composer and head of the Music Department of Republic Pictures during the 1930s and '40s. He was a captain in the Army Air Force during World War II. When he returned to NY in 1947, he teamed up with Ernie Martin, and they became Broadway producers for more than 50 years.

Their first show was an adaptation of the novel "Charley's Aunt" into the musical Where's Charley? They persuaded Ray Bolger, the Scarecrow from "The Wizard of Oz," to play the lead and Loesser to write the music and lyrics. George Abbott, an established force on Broadway, agreed to write the book and direct.

Where's Charley? received dreadful reviews when it opened at the St. James Theater in 1948, but the public loved it, and it ran for 840 performances.

Meanwhile, Mr. Feuer and Mr. Martin had decided to produce Guys and Dolls. Mr. Feuer, looking for a witty writer who could draw on the raffish characters of Damon Runyon's stories, picked Abe Burrows, with whom he had gone to high school. Loesser was again hired to write music and lyrics. Opening at the 46th Street Theater in 1950, the show starred Robert Alda and ran for 1,200 performances, winning the 1951 Tony Award for best musical. In that show Mr. Feuer was a pioneer in integrating a Broadway pit by hiring the black trumpeter Joe Wilder.

Then it was on to Can-Can written by Cole Porter, The Boyfriend starring newcomer Julie Andrews, and the Pulitzer winning How to Succeed (1961). In 1962 they tapped a young playwright named Neil Simon to write the book for Little Me, which Feuer also directed.

Feuer and Martin were at their peak from 1950 to 1965, a period often called the heyday of the American musical. This was before rock 'n' roll began its reign, when talents like Cole Porter, Irving Berlin and Rodgers and Hammerstein ruled the national culture, and shows like My Fair Lady and West Side Story went head-to-head on Broadway.

More than 20 years later, unhappy with the director of The Act, Martin Scorsese, they dropped him, saying he had more promise as a film director. That musical, set in a nightclub, played at the Majestic and lasted less than a year. During the 1970's and 80's, Mr. Martin and Mr. Feuer returned to the West Coast, working with Los Angeles and San Francisco opera companies and producing film versions of "A Chorus Line" and "Cabaret," to mixed success.

"Cabaret" (1972) won eight Academy Awards; the film version of "A Chorus Line" (1985), unlike the Broadway show, was widely considered a creative failure.

In all, Mr. Feuer produced a dozen Broadway musicals, with Mr. Martin or alone, ending with The Act, in 1977, starring Liza Minnelli. His final Broadway credit came two years later as director of I Remember Mama, which landed with a thud at the Majestic Theater and lasted 108 performances.

He was President and later Chairman of The League of American Theatres and Producers, Inc., the trade association for Broadway producers, presenters and theatres, from 1989-2003.

Source: The New York Times obituary



Productions Date of Productions
I Remember Mama
[Musical, Original]
  • Directed by Cy Feuer
May 31, 1979 - Sep 02, 1979
The Act
[Musical, Original]
  • Produced by Feuer & Martin
Oct 29, 1977 - Jul 01, 1978
The Goodbye People
[Play, Original]
  • Produced by Cy Feuer
Dec 03, 1968 - Dec 07, 1968
Marlene Dietrich
[Special, Concert, Original]
  • Theatre Owned / Operated by Feuer & Martin Musicals, Inc.
Oct 09, 1967 - Nov 18, 1967
Walking Happy
[Musical, Original]
  • Produced by Cy Feuer
  • Directed by Cy Feuer
Nov 26, 1966 - Apr 16, 1967
Skyscraper
[Musical, Comedy, Original]
  • Directed by Cy Feuer
  • Produced by Feuer & Martin
Nov 13, 1965 - Jun 11, 1966
Hamlet
[Play, Tragedy, Revival]
  • Theatre Owned / Operated by Feuer & Martin Musicals, Inc.
Apr 09, 1964 - Aug 08, 1964
Arturo Ui
[Play, Drama, Original]
  • Theatre Owned / Operated by Feuer & Martin Musicals, Inc.
Nov 11, 1963 - Nov 16, 1963
Little Me
[Musical, Comedy, Original]
  • Theatre Owned / Operated by Feuer & Martin Musicals, Inc.
  • Produced by Feuer & Martin
  • Directed by Cy Feuer
Nov 17, 1962 - Jun 29, 1963
How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
[Musical, Comedy, Original]
  • Produced by Feuer & Martin
Oct 14, 1961 - Mar 06, 1965
The Sound of Music
[Musical, Drama, Original]
  • Theatre Owned / Operated by Feuer & Martin Musicals, Inc.
    • - Replacement
Nov 16, 1959 - Jun 15, 1963
Whoop-Up
[Musical, Comedy, Original]
  • Directed by Cy Feuer
  • Produced by Cy Feuer
  • Book by Cy Feuer
Dec 22, 1958 - Feb 07, 1959
Silk Stockings
[Musical, Comedy, Original]
  • Directed by Cy Feuer
  • Produced by Feuer & Martin
Feb 24, 1955 - Apr 14, 1956
The Boy Friend
[Musical, Comedy, Original]
  • Produced by Feuer & Martin
  • Directed by Cy Feuer
Sep 30, 1954 - Nov 26, 1955
Can-Can
[Musical, Comedy, Original]
  • Produced by Feuer & Martin
May 07, 1953 - Jun 25, 1955
Where's Charley?
[Musical, Comedy, Original]
  • Produced by Feuer, Martin & Rickard
Jan 29, 1951 - Mar 10, 1951
Guys and Dolls
[Musical, Comedy, Original]
  • Produced by Feuer & Martin
Nov 24, 1950 - Nov 28, 1953
Where's Charley?
[Musical, Comedy, Original]
  • Produced by Cy Feuer
Oct 11, 1948 - Sep 09, 1950
2003 Tony Award® Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement
nominee Cy Feuer [recipient]
1967 Tony Award® Best Musical
 Walking Happy [nominee]
Produced by Cy Feuer
1966 Tony Award® Best Direction of a Musical
 Skyscraper [nominee]
Directed by Cy Feuer
1966 Tony Award® Best Musical
 Skyscraper [nominee]
Produced by Feuer & Martin
1963 Tony Award® Best Direction of a Musical
 Little Me [nominee]
Directed by Cy Feuer
1963 Tony Award® Best Musical
 Little Me [nominee]
Produced by Feuer & Martin
1963 Tony Award® Best Producer of a Musical
 Little Me [nominee]
Produced by Feuer & Martin
1962 Tony Award® Best Musical
winnerHow to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying [winner]
Produced by Feuer & Martin
1962 Tony Award® Best Producer of a Musical
winnerHow to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying [winner]
Produced by Feuer & Martin
1951 Tony Award® Best Musical
winnerGuys and Dolls [winner]
Produced by Feuer & Martin
Find out where Cy Feuer and are credited together