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Leonard Nimoy

Director, Performer
( b. Mar 26, 1931 Boston, Massachusetts, USA - d. Feb 27, 2015 Los Angeles, California, USA ) Male
Leonard Nimoy was the sonorous, gaunt-faced actor who won a worshipful global following as Mr. Spock, the resolutely logical human-alien first officer of the Starship Enterprise in the television and movie juggernaut "Star Trek."

His artistic pursuits -- poetry, photography and music in addition to acting -- ranged far beyond the United Federation of Planets, but it was as Mr. Spock that Mr. Nimoy became a folk hero, bringing to life one of the most indelible characters of the last half century: a cerebral, unflappable, pointy-eared Vulcan with a signature salute and blessing: "Live long and prosper" (from the Vulcan "Dif-tor heh smusma").

"Star Trek," which had its premiere on NBC on Sept. 8, 1966, made Mr. Nimoy a star. Gene Roddenberry, the creator of the franchise, called him "the conscience of 'Star Trek' " -- an often earnest, sometimes campy show that employed the distant future (as well as some primitive special effects by today's standards) to take on social issues of the 1960s.

His zeal to entertain and enlighten reached beyond "Star Trek" and crossed genres. He had a starring role in the dramatic television series "Mission: Impossible" and frequently performed onstage, notably as Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof. His poetry was voluminous, and he published books of his photography.

He also directed movies, including two from the "Star Trek" franchise, and television shows. And he made records, singing pop songs as well as original songs about "Star Trek," and gave spoken-word performances -- to the delight of his fans and the bewilderment of critics.

From the age of 8, Leonard acted in local productions, winning parts at a community college, where he performed through his high school years. In 1949, after taking a summer course at Boston College, he traveled to Hollywood, though it wasn't until 1951 that he landed small parts in two movies, "Queen for a Day" and "Rhubarb."

Mr. Nimoy served in the Army for two years, rising to sergeant and spending 18 months at Fort McPherson in Georgia, where he presided over shows for the Army's Special Services branch. He also directed and starred as Stanley in the Atlanta Theater Guild's production of A Streetcar Named Desire before receiving his final discharge in November 1955. He then returned to California, where he worked as a soda jerk, movie usher and cabdriver while studying acting at the Pasadena Playhouse. He achieved wide visibility in the late 1950s and early 1960s on television shows like "Wagon Train," "Rawhide" and "Perry Mason." Then came "Star Trek."

Mr. Nimoy directed two of the Star Trek movies, "Star Trek III: The Search for Spock" (1984) and "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" (1986), which he helped write. He then directed the hugely successful comedy "Three Men and a Baby" (1987), a far cry from his science-fiction work, and appeared in made-for-television movies.

In 2001 he voiced the king of Atlantis in the Disney animated movie "Atlantis: The Lost Empire," and in 2005 he furnished voice-overs for the computer game Civilization IV. More recently, he had a recurring role on the science-fiction series "Fringe" and was heard, as the voice of Spock, in an episode of the hit sitcom "The Big Bang Theory."

Mr. Nimoy was an active supporter of the arts as well. The Thalia, a venerable movie theater on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, now a multi-use hall that is part of Symphony Space, was renamed the Leonard Nimoy Thalia in 2002.

Source: The New York Times obituary 

ProductionsDate of Productions
The Apple Doesn't Fall...
[Play, Original]
  • Directed by Leonard Nimoy
Apr 14, 1996 - Apr 14, 1996
[Play, Drama, Original]
  • Performer: Leonard Nimoy
    • Martin Dysart - Replacement
Oct 24, 1974 - Oct 02, 1977
Full Circle
[Play, Revival]
  • Performer: Leonard Nimoy [Rohde]
Nov 07, 1973 - Nov 24, 1973
Find out where Leonard Nimoy and are credited together